Seed for agricultural and landscape uses — native grasses, wildflowers, lawn and pasture grasses, cover crops. Also commercial, organic and soluble fertilizers.

Showing 1–12 of 175 results

  • Clovers

    Clovers (18)

    a herbaceous plant of the pea family that has dense, globular flower heads, and leaves that are typically three-lobed. It is an important and widely grown fodder and rotational crop.
  • Cover Crop

    Cover Crop (25)

    Vegetable production involves many practices that compromise soil health, and therefore limit productivity. Some of the management goals for which farmers use cover crops include: Suppressing weeds Protecting soil from rain or runoff Improving soil aggregate stability Reducing surface crusting Adding active organic matter to soil Breaking hardpan Fixing nitrogen Scavenging soil nitrogen Suppressing soil diseases and pests
  • Erosion Control Seed

    Erosion Control Seed (5)

    The primary goal of erosion control is to: Maintain water quality - source control - keep soil in place. Not increase runoff quantity - maintain existing runoff volume through infiltration. Maintain air quality - control dust by minimizing wind erosion. Tips for Planting Erosion Control Seed Application Rate:
    • 40-60#s per acre --steep areas or soils prone to erosion should use the higher end of the range.
    • 1- 1 1/2#s per 1,000 square foot
    Seeding Your Area Mid September to Mid November.  Here, the soil is still warm and prior to the onset of winter rains. Soil Preparation Mow down existing grasses and weeds, if possible, rake the soil, then broadcast seed. Additionally, a material such as straw, jute netting or other erosion control method should be used to protect the seed from birds, wind, etc. Establishing the Grasses Using Annuals for Erosion Control (i.e., LeBallister's Economy Mix, Quick Cover, Annual Ryegrass) Benefits of Annuals:
    • Fast germination and establishment. Annuals should be used in areas where the threat of erosion is high.
    • Usually provide a dense root system
    • Annuals have a very good reseeding capacity
    • Can help with weed suppression
    • Relatively cost effective
    Disadvantages of Annuals:
    • Tend to be tall
    • Can be difficult to eradicate if you no longer want them in the area.
    Without irrigation, your seeded area will go to seed in late spring. If you plan on mowing the area, take care to mow after the seed heads are fully developed and drying out. The seed that is produced should continue to provide good erosion control. Using Perennials for Erosion Control (i.e., LeBallister's Pathway Mix, Fine Fescue Blend, most native grasses) Benefits of Perennials:
    • Generally stay shorter than annual grasses. Because of the shorter stature, a better option for mixing in wildflowers.
    • Will stay green for a longer period of time, particularly in wet areas. Can do well with irrigation.
    • More shade tolerance
    Disadvantages of Perennials:
    • Slower than annuals to germinate and establish
    • Can be crowded out by annual weeds and grasses
    With perennial grasses, your seeded area will go dormant in the summer. Once established, perennial grasses can be mowed at any time, but take care not to mow too short and harm the crown of the plant.
  • Fertilizer

    Fertilizer (40)

    Due to frequent price adjustments and quantity discounts, please call for a fertilizer price quote.
  • Native Grasses

    Native Grasses (17)

    A short list of favorites for the garden include Agrostis pallens, Little Three Native Blend including Molate Fescue, Mokelumne Fescue and Idaho Fescue, as well as Purple Needlegrass Nassella pulchra (our state grass here in California).
  • Native Mixes

    Native Mixes (3)

    Experts conclude that native grasslands in California are among the most endangered ecosystem in the United States. Due in most part to historical land use and introduced disease, it is estimated that less than 1% of our state’s original grasslands remain. Fortunately, as forward-thinking home and business owners, we can address this issue by including California’s native grasses in our residential and commercial landscapes. A short list of favorites for the garden include Purple Three-Awn Aristida purpurea, Blue Grama Bouteloua gracilis, California Fescue Festuca californica, Giant Wild Rye Leymus condensatus, California Melic Melica californica, Deer Grass Muhlenbergia rigens, and Purple Needlegrass Nassella pulchra (our state grass here in California). Grass-like species such as Sedges Carex spp. are a great addition to a California-friendly, native garden as well.
  • Organic Seed

    Organic Seed (6)

    These seeds are grown under conditions mandated by the National Standard for Organic Agriculture, Due to regulations, we are not able to custom mix on site and maintain the certified organic seed status. Call for a quotes on certified organic mixes – Minimum orders of 1,000#s
  • Pasture

    Pasture (10)

    Of all the plants, the grasses are the most important to man. Grasslands—from improved pastures to natural rangelands—cover more than half of U.S. land area, not only providing forage for livestock and wildlife but also helping to stabilize soils and to reduce erosion. Within pastures and rangeland, there are three major plant groups: true grasses legumes forbs These plants are critical for most small farms, yet they’re often overlooked, underappreciated and undervalued by farmers. When you look at the pastures on your farm, you might think of them strictly as grass, but they are so much more. Pastures are complex environments that typically support many species of plants and creatures great and small, ranging from your livestock to microbes, insects, birds and wild animals. Tips for Planting a Pasture Application Rate:
    1. New pasture - Drill: 25lbs per acre
    2. Overseed Existing Pasture or Broadcast New Pasture: 30-35lbs per acre
    3. No-till drill: 15-18lbs per acre
    Seeding Your Pasture
    1. Dryland pastures---Mid September to Mid November. Here, the soil is still warm and prior to the onset of winter rains.
    2. Irrigated pastures- March thru October.
     Soil Preparation New pasture---Disk down and follow with harrow or roller to break down clods and level planting area.
    1. Overseed established pasture--Mow down existing grasses and weeds, rake or harrow the land, broadcast seed, then use a drag, i.e.: chain link fence over the top.
    Weed Control The planting area may contain excessive weed population.  One method used to reduce weed contamination is to pre-irrigate the area prior to disking, thus allowing the weeds to germinate and be eliminated. Be aware that frequently, dormant weed seed in the and soil may appear following pasture establishment. Establishing Your Pasture There are many factors that dictate how long to let your pasture establish before allowing animals to graze.  But generally, as long as the pasture is relatively well drained, you should be able to allow animals onto the pasture when the grasses have reached a height of 8-12 inches.  Be careful not to over graze the area, do not allow the grasses to be grazed below 3-4 inches. Without irrigation, your pasture will go dormant in the summer, but when the fall rains return, it will, with proper management, provide feed for your animals for years to come.  
  • Turf Grass Mixes

    Turf Grass Mixes (6)

    Cool season grasses are predominant in the north coast region. Cool season grasses start growth at 5 °C (41 °F), and grow at their fastest rate when temperatures are between 10 °C (50 °F) and 25 °C (77 °F), in climates that have relatively mild/cool summers, with two periods of rapid growth in the spring and autumn.[30] They retain their color well in extreme cold and typically grow very dense, carpetlike lawns with relatively little thatch. Conventional selections: Bluegrass (Poa spp.) Bentgrass (Agrostis spp.) Ryegrasses (Lolium spp.) Fescues (Festuca spp., hybrids, and cultivars) Tips for Planting a Lawn Application Rate: New Lawn --8 to 10 pounds per 1,000 square feet Over seeding an existing lawn -- 5 pounds per 1,000 square feet First things first....Soil Preparation The more fertile and balanced the soil at the beginning, the better your lawn will establish and thrive. Clear the planting area of rocks, roots and all debris.  Apply a good quality compost.  Do not add materials that are not composted, such as sawdust, wood chips or straw; these materials will tie up nitrogen and make it unavailable to the new plants. Use a rotary tiller to work the compost into the top 4-8 inches. Following the rotary tilling, rake and smooth area.  To avoid  low and high spots, use a roller to make it as level as possible. Apply the Seed Calculate the area to be seeded and make sure to have the proper amount of seed on hand.    Use  a  hand held broadcast spreader, or a drop spreader on wheels.  These are available at any garden supply store.  Hand application can result in uneven distribution. Divide the seed quantity in half and cover the entire area by walking back and forth in one direction.  Take the second half and cover the area again, walking back and forth in the opposite direction. Finishing Steps It is important that the seed has good soil contact to optimize germination and growth.  First, lightly rake the seed into the soil surface; taking care not to bury the seed too deep. One of the most important steps is to topdress the seed.  This will aid in germination, reduce loss to birds, and most of all, help retain moisture.  There are several options, but a quality compost or peat moss are two of your better choices.  Perhaps clean straw or wood (sawdust or chips) but these may take an extended time to decompose. Last But Certainly Not Least -- Water Once seed has germinated, it is important to have the soil retain approximately one half inch depth of moisture.   Soil conditions and weather are major factors in determining water applications.   A new lawn generally requires water 2-3 times a day during a hot spell.  If our north coast marine layer is a regular occurrence, 1-2 times a day should be adequate.  Fifteen to twenty minutes per watering is recommended. When to Mow Most grasses will prefer to be kept at a height of 2-3 inches.  The rule of thumb is to mow no more than one-third of the grass's height at one time, otherwise you shock the plant and cause stress.   A new lawn should grow to approximately 4 inches then mow 1 inch. Once established, apply a  lawn fertilizer, particularly in the fall and spring -- the primary growing seasons.  LeBallister's carries both organic and non-organic fertilizer options for keeping your lawn healthy and beautiful.    
  • Turf Grasses

    Turf Grasses (9)

    Cool season grasses are predominant in the north coast region. Cool season grasses start growth at 5 °C (41 °F), and grow at their fastest rate when temperatures are between 10 °C (50 °F) and 25 °C (77 °F), in climates that have relatively mild/cool summers, with two periods of rapid growth in the spring and autumn.[30] They retain their color well in extreme cold and typically grow very dense, carpetlike lawns with relatively little thatch. Conventional selections: Bluegrass (Poa spp.) Bentgrass (Agrostis spp.) Ryegrasses (Lolium spp.) Fescues (Festuca spp., hybrids, and cultivars) Tips for Planting a Lawn Application Rate: New Lawn --8 to 10 pounds per 1,000 square feet Over seeding an existing lawn -- 5 pounds per 1,000 square feet First things first....Soil Preparation The more fertile and balanced the soil at the beginning, the better your lawn will establish and thrive. Clear the planting area of rocks, roots and all debris.  Apply a good quality compost.  Do not add materials that are not composted, such as sawdust, wood chips or straw; these materials will tie up nitrogen and make it unavailable to the new plants. Use a rotary tiller to work the compost into the top 4-8 inches. Following the rotary tilling, rake and smooth area.  To avoid  low and high spots, use a roller to make it as level as possible. Apply the Seed Calculate the area to be seeded and make sure to have the proper amount of seed on hand.    Use  a  hand held broadcast spreader, or a drop spreader on wheels.  These are available at any garden supply store.  Hand application can result in uneven distribution. Divide the seed quantity in half and cover the entire area by walking back and forth in one direction.  Take the second half and cover the area again, walking back and forth in the opposite direction. Finishing Steps It is important that the seed has good soil contact to optimize germination and growth.  First, lightly rake the seed into the soil surface; taking care not to bury the seed too deep. One of the most important steps is to topdress the seed.  This will aid in germination, reduce loss to birds, and most of all, help retain moisture.  There are several options, but a quality compost or peat moss are two of your better choices.  Perhaps clean straw or wood (sawdust or chips) but these may take an extended time to decompose. Last But Certainly Not Least -- Water Once seed has germinated, it is important to have the soil retain approximately one half inch depth of moisture.   Soil conditions and weather are major factors in determining water applications.   A new lawn generally requires water 2-3 times a day during a hot spell.  If our north coast marine layer is a regular occurrence, 1-2 times a day should be adequate.  Fifteen to twenty minutes per watering is recommended. When to Mow Most grasses will prefer to be kept at a height of 2-3 inches.  The rule of thumb is to mow no more than one-third of the grass's height at one time, otherwise you shock the plant and cause stress.   A new lawn should grow to approximately 4 inches then mow 1 inch. Once established, apply a  lawn fertilizer, particularly in the fall and spring -- the primary growing seasons.  LeBallister's carries both organic and non-organic fertilizer options for keeping your lawn healthy and beautiful.
  • Wildflower Seed Mixes

    Wildflower Seed Mixes (8)

    WHEN TO PLANT WILDFLOWERS If you are hand-watering or using irrigation, you may plant wildflowers just about anytime of the year. The natural time to plant, however is early fall, before the first rain or during the early part of the rain season. The blooming season will begin the following spring, though some perennials may need two years to take hold. PLANTING RATES The amount of seed needed to sow any given area may vary a bit with the type of soil, climate, terrain, etc. Our recommendations are for fairly flat areas, clear of trees and shrubbery. Amount of Seed Area Covered 1 oz 150-200 square feet 1 lb 1,000-3,000 square feet 15 lbs One acre, flat terrain 20 lbs One acre, sloping terrain HOW TO SOW WILDFLOWERS It is common practice, where accessible, to use a “belly grinder” or drop spreader to spread seeds over an area. Quite often good results are obtainable by merely scattering the seeds by hand. We suggest that an inert spreader such as sand or some other inert “carrier” be used, to help spread the seed evenly. Use a product similar in weight and size to the seed mix. Use a 4:1 ratio, by volume of “carrier” to seed. If possible, rake in lightly. Most seeds do not need to be laid very deep and, in fact, might perform more poorly if planted too deep. SITE PREPARATION Weed control is very important. Remove as much undesired vegetation from the area as possible. Wildflowers can be quite hardy, but natural grasses and weeds are some of nature’s most vigorous plants. Grasses may become thick and matted, and not a good condition under which most wildflowers can survive. IF IRRIGATION IS AVAILABLE All surface areas must be kept continuously moist. This is accomplished with frequent, light watering. Please do not allow the newly seeded areas to dry out. Once the seeds have germinated and the planted area looks established, the plants should be gradually weaned from water. Water may be applied with less frequency, but for longer periods of time; deep watering will encourage deep root growth. IF NO IRRIGATION IS AVAILABLE During the rainy months of Fall, Winter, Spring, wildflower seeds are soaked for a long period of time. During this time, their natural dormancy is broken. The seed germinate and immediately begin to send down long tap roots. When the warm days of Spring come, they literally burst into bloom!!!!
  • Wildflowers

    Wildflowers (26)

    WHEN TO PLANT WILDFLOWERS If you are hand-watering or using irrigation, you may plant wildflowers just about anytime of the year. The natural time to plant, however is early fall, before the first rain or during the early part of the rain season. The blooming season will begin the following spring, though some perennials may need two years to take hold. PLANTING RATES The amount of seed needed to sow any given area may vary a bit with the type of soil, climate, terrain, etc. Our recommendations are for fairly flat areas, clear of trees and shrubbery. Amount of Seed Area Covered 1 oz 150-200 square feet 1 lb 1,000-3,000 square feet 15 lbs One acre, flat terrain 20 lbs One acre, sloping terrain HOW TO SOW WILDFLOWERS It is common practice, where accessible, to use a “belly grinder” or drop spreader to spread seeds over an area. Quite often good results are obtainable by merely scattering the seeds by hand. We suggest that an inert spreader such as sand or some other inert “carrier” be used, to help spread the seed evenly. Use a product similar in weight and size to the seed mix. Use a 4:1 ratio, by volume of “carrier” to seed. If possible, rake in lightly. Most seeds do not need to be laid very deep and, in fact, might perform more poorly if planted too deep. SITE PREPARATION Weed control is very important. Remove as much undesired vegetation from the area as possible. Wildflowers can be quite hardy, but natural grasses and weeds are some of nature’s most vigorous plants. Grasses may become thick and matted, and not a good condition under which most wildflowers can survive. IF IRRIGATION IS AVAILABLE All surface areas must be kept continuously moist. This is accomplished with frequent, light watering. Please do not allow the newly seeded areas to dry out. Once the seeds have germinated and the planted area looks established, the plants should be gradually weaned from water. Water may be applied with less frequency, but for longer periods of time; deep watering will encourage deep root growth. IF NO IRRIGATION IS AVAILABLE During the rainy months of Fall, Winter, Spring, wildflower seeds are soaked for a long period of time. During this time, their natural dormancy is broken. The seed germinate and immediately begin to send down long tap roots. When the warm days of Spring come, they literally burst into bloom!!!!
  • Barley

    100% ORGANIC – Barley


  • Cayuse Oats 1

    100% ORGANIC – Cayuse Oats

    Cool season annual grass used for cover crops, erosion control, hay and silage. Tolerant of many soil types as long as there is drainage.

    Application Rate: 2-3#s per 1,000 sq ft./100#s per acre


  • Winter Pea

    100% ORGANIC – Winter Pea


  • 100% ORGANIC – Triticale

    100% ORGANIC – Triticale


  • Wheat

    100% ORGANIC – Wheat

    Cool season annual grass most often used for hay or silage.  It has excellent nutritional value. Does best in well drained, fertile soils.

    Application Rate: 2-3#s per 1,000 sq ft./100#s per acre


  • 100% ORGANIC PLOWDOWN MIX

    100% ORGANIC PLOWDOWN MIX


  • Ag Tabs

    Agriform Plant Tabs

    $58.00

    Agriform Plant Tabs

    500 tablets


  • Agrostis pallens – Bentgrass

    Agrostis pallens – Bentgrass

    $22.50 per pound

  • ALL GRASS HORSE MIX

    ALL GRASS HORSE MIX


  • Per WF Web

    ALL PERENNIAL WILDFLOWER MIX

    $24.00 per pound

  • Alyssum

    Alyssum, Sweet

    $17.00 per pound

  • Azomite Micronized (44# bag)

    Azomite Micronized (44# bag)

    $21.00 per lb

    OMRI listed rock dust with over 70 trace minerals.

    44 lb bag